Timetables

What should my freshman be doing to prepare for the future?
**Closely monitor your child’s progress in college preparatory classes.
**Meet with the guidance counselor and teachers to assess your child’s adjustment to and progress in high school. Determine appropriate course placement.
**Encourage your child’s involvement in personal, school and community activities. At least one activity should be some type of social or community service.
**Begin building an extracurricular resume of school activities.
**Discuss what you and your child view as strengths they have and how those strengths might fit into a career choice.
**Continue to help your child organize and prioritize his life. They should be in the habit of studying every school night for a minimum of an hour and a half. Remember - there is no such thing as no homework. They can always review what happened in class that day.
**Meet with the guidance counselor to plan the tenth grade schedule. Encourage placement in honors or advanced classes if your child has done well in related courses in grade nine.
**Inquire about summer programs and support your child’s participation in summer activity (camp, work, travel or volunteer service).
**Obtain a summer reading list from the English department and encourage your child to select an appropriate number of books to read.

What should my sophomore be doing now to prepare for the future?
**Consult with the guidance counselor about having your child take the PSAT in October.
**Meet with teachers to review your child’s progress.
** Students will take the PLAN test in October and have the results back to them by January. The results will show them how they measure against other 10th grade students in the nation. It is also a practice ACT so they will see what academic weaknesses they may have so they can register for classes in 11th grade.
**Meet with teachers to review your child’s progress.
**Meet with the guidance counselor to discuss your child’s eleventh grade schedule. Help plan an academically challenging program.
**Begin making exploratory college visits on weekends.
**Attend local college fairs, especially the Omaha area college fair in October on UNO’s campus.
**10th grade students should continue to be involved at school and to be involved with community service.
**Explore summer programs that tap into your child’s possible career interests or skill reinforcing.
**Obtain a summer reading list.
**Build a study schedule for the PSAT or ACT.
**Explore the resources in the College/Career Center.

What should my junior be doing to prepare for senior year and life after RHS?
--Strong study habits and time management techniques will pay off. Keep your grades up.

--Investigate extracurricular activities in which you would like to participate - if not already involved.

-- Meet with Mrs. Balus or a guidance counselor to"talk college criteria". Do your courses meet basic college requirements? What tests should I take? How can I get financial aid? What advice do you have for me?

- Read the College/Career Center's "Junior Newsletter" published in the fall and spring. Use as a guide to prepare for your senior year.

-- Explore colleges. Attend the Greater Omaha Area College Fair on UNO's campus, individual college fairs & college nights. During the 2nd semester,attend the college visitations in College/Career Center. Keep in mind your interests, abilities and what you hope to gain from college.

--October - Sign up for the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT). Prep course is available - inquire in College/Career Center.

-- Conduct a computer search (College View and NCIS) on careers and schools through College/Career Center.

-- Write to schools for general information. (Pre-typed letter available in C /C Center).Visit C/C- Center and review the school material in our files.

-- Update resume - If you have not started a resume, do so now. Refer to sample resume in this booklet.

-- Check with C/C-Center or your counselor as to which college entrance test you should take. Take an ACT/SAT preparation course and/or use computer assisted preparation material available in C/C Center. Register for these tests on time.

-- Early 2nd semester, collect information on ROTC scholarships, application to service academies, or prestigious colleges, if interested. Basic information can be found in C/C-Center.

-- January - Attend Junior Parent Meeting at RHS.

-- Spring - Develop a preliminary list of colleges that are of interest to you. (Computer search in C/C Center can be helpful for this.) Begin to collect information on selected colleges during the summer.

--Try an academic summer program offered by colleges to high school juniors. This is a chance for you to do something which will distinguish you from the rest.

-- Consider summer and part-time jobs which may lead to careers after high school.

-- Visit colleges/universities during the summer.

-- Continue to discuss options/goals with parents, C/C-Center and counselor.

What should my senior be doing now to prepare for the life after RHS?
-- Aug./Sept. - Begin serious planning on where you will attend college. Narrow your list to about five schools.This allows for one "long shot" school, 2 or 3 schools which honestly match your interests and academic abilities, and at least 1 college which you definitely feel will accept you and you can afford.

--September - Parents should plan to attend the Senior Parent Meeting at RHS.

--Write your resume/update your existing one. This needs to be current so you can use it for applications and to give to adults when you ask them to write you a letter of recommendation.

--Set up files for your selected colleges. Enlist parents help with deadlines, documents, etc.

-- Watch your Senior Newsletter. Pick up admission and scholarship applications in C/C-Center.

-- Visit with college representatives in College/Career Center. Refer to Visitation section in this book.

-- October - December - After reviewing your ACT/SAT scores, you may want to retake ACT/SAT to better your score. Colleges consider your better score.

-- October - Narrow your choices to 3 or 4 schools. Visit if possible. Make application.

-- November - Continue with applications. Watch due dates!

-- November - December - Collect and familiarize yourself with college and financial aid forms. Federal financial aid forms are available in December. Make a note of all important filing deadlines.

-- Admissions applications should be filed by the end of December. You will probably have to write at least one essay for each application, so prepare now.

-- Obtain recommendations from those teachers who know you as a person as well as your accomplishments and abilities. Supply each teacher with a resume of your interests and activities.

-- Take advantage of the holiday season to visit with any returning college students you know. Ask them specific questions about the college they attend as well as questions about college in general.

-- January - Parents should plan to attend the Financial Aid Meeting at RHS.

-- January - March - Complete and send the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Information from parents' previous year's income tax forms is needed to complete FAFSA.

-- Keep your grades up. Most colleges admit students only on the premise that they will maintain their grades and fulfill the high school graduation requirements.

-- March - April - Make final decision from among those colleges to which you are admitted. In writing, notify the school you choose. Submit your FAFSA by March 1.

-- Continue to refine career goals and the means of attaining them through the use of C/C-Center.

-- March-May - Use the Scholarship Reporting Form to report all scholarships you receive to Mrs. Balus. This allows you to be acknowledged in newspaper publications and on Sr. Honors Night.
-- May - Notify guidance office to have your final transcript sent to the school you will be attending this fall.
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